Pride and Fulfillment - Part 1

I started working as an intern more than a decade ago, at December of 2009. Looking back at my journey makes me smile, as although it was hard at times, it has certainly been fulfilling.

I could still remember my days at high school, how I simply wasted my time there, not engaging into any school activities, consistently skipping schools until I got to the point that I was almost expelled.

I was never the brightest kid in the block. I only excelled in one thing, and that is computers. But aside from that, I only got average grades, and I never really bothered about my grades. My brother on the other hand was your typical achiever, even getting 99 on Math on his last year of high school.

As I've said, I did excel at my computer subjects, and even though I rarely go to school, I would always get one of the highest, if not the highest, grades in that subject. It all started at 6th grade, when I was 9 years old. That's the time when I first got my hands on QBasic, and I was fascinated on conditions, making my own text based RPG. It wasn't hard, really. It's just a bunch of IF statements.

Skipping classes at UAE

Back at UAE, I had a couple of friends with me that would cut classes too, and I guess that's the reason why I never really bothered about my grades at all. Those were fun days, and although I do regret not getting engaged at school as a normal kid should have, looking back as I type this on Typora, I would say that I genuinely was happy with how I decided to waste my time.

Yeah, sure, I was not able to improve my social skills with what I did, but I was happy.

That all changed though when I had to tag along with my brother to the Philippines when he had to go to college there.

High-school in the Philippines

My brother, being good at math, went to study at Mapua Institute of Technology, a renowned school in the Philippines, producing some of the best engineers in the country. I was in my 10th grade that year, and I just transferred to a new school in the Philippines. I did not know how to speak Tagalog, but I could understand it very well.

As you would imagine, I had a hard time in my Filipino subject, but I did end up getting a barely passing grade for that subject. What caught me off-guard though is how advance their math subject was compared to my previous school at UAE. Yes, sure, I barely went to school, but I still had average grades at my exams, so I supposedly should know what was being discussed on the first day of class... But no, I did not know a thing at all.

With that, I am totally grateful for my math teacher, sir Roger, for helping me catch up on my Math class. I did well, considering that I was almost expelled due to me skipping almost a month straight, since I got 94 in my card by the end of the school year.

Another teacher that I am very grateful for is Ma'am Perla. It was her that saved me from getting expelled from school. She was the one who notified my mom that I was not going to school for 29 days straight (Calendar days). She did not shame me, but rather, helped me to graduate.

I honestly do regret the time I wasted during my stay at this school. I should've been more active at school... I feel like I missed a lot. I regret it more compared to how I felt I spent my time back at UAE. The school at UAE is very boring, it wasn't much of a challenge (I easily passed even though I rarely went to class), and the majority of my classmates there viewed school as a joke, or at least their actions make it seem like school is a joke. The school I went to at the Philippines is a complete opposite. Most of the students there seemed to view school seriously, and I felt an environment that was trying to "push" me to be better, albeit I only felt it after I almost got expelled.

There were also a couple of students that I admired, for being better than me.

One was Jairon, who I saw as a walking calculator. I just wished that I was even half as good as him at math.

Another was JJ. He was very diligent at his studies. I have this feeling that I would really enjoy being around him as my classmate (I did prefer being around him back then), and even as a colleague. I love being around smart people, and he was certainly a smart one.

He was great at ICT too, and competed to be the best in ICT (Computer) subject. I honestly think I would've topped him though, since I consistently got 98-99 in my card in that subject even with me missing almost a month of classes straight, plus a dozen or more absences here and there... although me being a transfer student, I wasn't qualified to get any honor roles, or any awards. I don't know why there was such a rule, but I didn't mind back then. Oh, he did not pursue a career in a computer related field though, which is a bummer since I really wanted to have a chance for me to be his colleague. He went for forestry, and seemed to excel in that path... as expected.

Nica was another one. She was very diligent, although did not seem to have the same field of interest as I have. She was just like JJ, just that JJ seemed to like computers, and excelled in computers, just like me. I love computers since 6th grade, and seemed to excel at it. I used to admire her, and saw her as a girl beyond my league... You know, the typical lead girl in some TV high-school dramas that had both the brains and the looks. Yes, I'm attracted to smart, goal oriented people. (note: I ended up marrying a girl that is smart, career oriented, and independent. Yeah, I still prefer to be around smart, goal oriented individuals)

I never became close to them, or so I think. I wished I could. I wish I did.

It never came to be, as on the next door in life after high-school, I felt that the gap widened a lot more... mainly due to what I felt as an unfair situation.