Sense of ownership

I'm now alone as a frontend engineer at my day job. I contemplated as to why I was saved from getting kicked out. Why him, and not me.

This occurred after the Mobile developer from my side project got booted out, and our frontend engineer almost suffered the same fate. I am a full-stack engineer over there, and I thought that I would end up having more frontend tasks on my plate. Good thing that he was able to turn things around and did not taste the wrath of the fire hammer.

What dawned on me when I thought about that was the meeting we had right after our mobile dev was kicked out. The owner of the company noted that me and my colleague (the guy who pulled me into this side project) was exceptional, wherein we were different from the rest of the team due to our sense of ownership.

I always have this sense of ownership on every project that I touch. I take pride on the code that I write. It seems to me that this is also one of the reason why I was not fired from my day job, and it also seems, to me, the reason why my colleague was chased out of the company.

The official reason though is that they had difficulty with communicating with him, and they had a couple of complaints about his work ethics. But if you think about it, their official complaints would have been naught had he been a little more responsive, emitting a sense of responsibility, a sense of ownership, on the tasks that he owned.

If you had a sense of ownership on the project that you are working on, you would take pride on your work. If there are certain complaints on your output, you would most likely make sure that that gets resolved right away. You would also make sure that your understanding of the owner's vision align by clarifying each and every detail.

This exact sense of ownership was what held me back from leaving my previous work, although it also sort of fired back due to the disappointing reception of Player.me's desktop application.

Due to these two very current events on the employment situation of my now former colleagues did I feel the importance of my work ethics, my sense of ownership, on me retaining my job.

It also made me think in the heads of my employers, and yeah, I too would prefer employees that take pride on the work that they do, owning up their projects with passion. It's easier to trust these types of people to work on your project, your product.

Now, my now former colleague at my day job used to have a sense of ownership on his projects. I know this because I knew he was very responsive even on weekends when we were still working on our previous project (Aside: that project ended around the start of this year). But lately, due to our project not being in such a critical stage, it would seem to the owner of the company that his enthusiasm on his work has waned compared to mine. I don't blame him though, since I am also working on another product that gave me the opportunity to exert this sort of enthusiasm that the owner of the company is looking for.

But alas, this also, I think, gave the owner of the company a point of comparison which might have exacerbated the situation for my colleague. This made me feel a little guilty when I first heard the news. I even talked to our project manager about this, telling her that I shouldn't have went above and beyond on the project, to the point that I even had times where I worked at midnights just to ensure that we delivered what was promised.

She just told me that what I did was the correct thing considering the state of the project, and that exerting effort is what the employers are expecting from their employees.

At the end of the day, although I do still have a job, I still feel down due to these occurrences... and the fact that I'm now alone as a developer at my day job :(